Good opposition, bad opposition? The role of the opposition in Kenya's 2017 elections

9 mar 2018 08:30 09:30 ENG
Matthew Gichohi UiB Lise Rakner CMI/UiB

Matthew Gichohi (UiB) and Lise Rakner (CMI/UiB) in conversation with Svein-Erik Helle (CMI/UiB)

Opposition parties and actors are often rightly lauded as heroes in processes of democratization. But is it always right and constructive to challenge an incumbent by any means possible? In this seminar, we will discuss this question by looking at the role of the opposition in the ongoing aftermath of the 2017 elections in Kenya. After contesting the first election in court and winning, Raila Odinga and has NASA coalition decided to first boycott the repeat election and then unilaterally swear in Odinga as the ‘People’s President’. The declaration has served as an excuse for the Kenyan government to target opposition politicians and close space for political discussion. The situation closely mirrors events in 2016 in neighboring Uganda – and in numerous other non-institutionalized regimes. Is confrontation always the right is answer to injustice in such situations?

Matthew Gichohi (UiB) and Lise Rakner (CMI/UiB) in conversation with Svein-Erik Helle (CMI/UiB)

Croissants & coffee included!

Photo: Chatham House

 

Breakfasts for Democracy (#bffDemocracy)

Democratic institutions and human rights are increasingly under pressure in both the developed and the developing world. In this breakfast seminar series, we will discuss current events in light of our current knowledge of the politics of processes of democratization and autocratization. Through conversations with scholars engaged in ongoing research on the topic, the seminar series will provide new and research-based insights on current events in the ongoing struggle for democracy and human rights.

Breakfast hosts: Svein-Erik Helle and Lisa-Marie Selvik

 

"Breakfasts for Democracy» is organised through the joint CMI/UiB research project 'Breaking BAD: Understanding the Backlash Against Democracy in Africa’, in collaboration with Bergen Resource Center and Centre for Law and Social Transformation.